About the 2018 House

Cedaridge Farm is a charming property located in Tinicum Township. It is an area of awe-inspiring natural beauty and was once the home of the Lenni-Lenape Indians, also known as the Delaware Indians. The township is bordered on the south by Tohickon Creek, a name derived from the Indian name Tohickhanne, which translates as “the stream we cross on driftwood”.

 

Unlike most of Bucks County where settlers purchased individual farms, Tinicum Township was part of two large tracts owned by absentee landlords. The northern portion was owned by the London Land Company while the southwestern part, including Cedaridge Farms, was known as the Streiper Tract. Jan Streiper purchased 4,448 acres from William Penn in 1703. He never immigrated to America, and on his death rights to the property were heavily disputed. James Logan, a close associate of the Penn family purchased the rights from Streiper’s heirs and returned it to the Penns in exchange for what was considered more valuable land in Durham Township. In May 1738, the Streiper tract was sold as 25 separate tracts.

 

In the early 18th century, a stream of emigrants crossed over the Tohickon into the wilderness and lived peacefully with the Indians. With the denser settlement, they asked for a township to be organized and called it Tennicunk, derived from the Lenni-Lenape meaning “along the edge of the island.” Several spellings of this name existed during the eighteenth century until it finally was formally organized as Tinicum Township in 1747.The early settlers were of Scots-Irish or English descent, followed by settlers of German descent.

 

These early pioneers farmed the land, established mills, invented and patented farming equipment and fought to establish the free United States of America. By the early 20th century, Eastern Europeans joined Tinicum’s melting pot, arriving from Russia and Poland.

 

The first record for the land on which Cedaridge Farm now stands was in 1775 as part of a 200-acre estate owned by John Mains. In 1782 John Mains and his wife Grace sold to Josiah Matlock, a carpenter from Philadelphia and his wife Elizabeth. They sold 180 acres to Samuel Burroughs of New Jersey in 1786, who in turn sold it to John Hoppock of Hunterdon County New Jersey. The 1798 Federal District Tax records show that 85 acres of this land were rented by Daniel Cooper. The property included a 30 by20 one-story house of stone and log construction and a 35 by 25 frame barn. In 1817 the property was divided but the Hoppock family retained the85 acres until 1867, at which time it passed to John W. Swope and his wife Caroline Rau Swope. Other owners included the Rodney family from 1931 until 1942 and the Brande family from 1942 until 1955. Paul J Campbell purchased the twenty-one acres that are Cedaridge Farm in 1955 and sold it to Derek Fell in 1988.

 

Today, Tinicum is home to several wonderful parks with rich histories, including Tinicum County Park, Tohickon Valley Park, and Ralph Stover State Park. In 1952, Bucks County native and author, James Michener, a resident of Tinicum, donated seven acres overlooking Tohickon Creek to be added to Ralph Stover State Park. This area, known as Indian Rocks or High Rocks, is just around the corner from Cedaridge Farm.

 

To protect the area’s rural character and natural resources for future generations, Bucks County and the Tinicum Conservancy work with property owners to safeguard lands against development. More than 4,700 acres, including Cedaridge Farm, have been placed in the conservancy to date.